United States Regiments & Batteries > New York > Infantry


“1st Regiment Eagle Brigade”

“Cameron Highlanders”

The 78th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment lost 3 Officers and 55 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 73 Enlisted men by disease during the Civil War. It is honored by a monument at Gettysburg shared with the 102nd New York Infantry.

1862
January to April Organized at New York City under Colonel Daniel Ullman, Lieutenant Colonel Jonathan Austin and Major Henry C. Blanchard. Company K was from Michigan.
April 29 Left State for Washington, D.C. Attached to Defenses of Washington
May 24 Moved to Harper’s Ferry and attached to 2nd Brigade, Sigel’s Division, Dept. of the Shenandoah
May 28-30 Defense of Harper’s Ferry
June Operations in the Shenandoah Valley attached to 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 2nd Corps, Pope’s Army of Virginia
August 9
Battle of Cedar Mountain

The regiment lost 22 casualties

August 16-September 2 Pope’s Campaign in Northern Virginia attached to 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 2nd Corps, Army of Virginia
August 23-24 Battles of Sulphur Springs
August 29 Groveton
August 30
Second Battle of Bull Run
September 6-12 Maryland Campaign. Attached to 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 12th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac
September 14 South Mountain
September 16-17
Battle of Antietam

The regiment was commanded by Lieutenant Colonel Austin until he took over brigade command with the death of Colonel Goodrich. Captain Henry R. Stagg then took command, The 78th New York went into action with 12 officers and 209 men and lost 34 casualties.

From the first of three War Department markers for Goodrich’s Brigade on the Antietam battlefield:

Goodrich’s Brigade was detached from its Division, when east of Joseph Poffenberger’s, and ordered to the assistance of Doubleday’s Division. It crossed the Hagerstwon Pike near Miller’s, formed in the north part of the West Woods and on the open ground east of them and, supported by Patrick’s Brigade, advanced in the direction of the Dunkard Church. When nearing this point it was stubbornly resisted by the enemy posted in the woods immediately southwest of this, and Colonel Goodrich was mortally wounded. The loss in the Brigade was heavy and it was obliged to retire.

From the second of three War Department markers for Goodrich’s Brigade on the Antietam battlefield:

When nearing the East Woods, early on the 17th, Goodrich’s Brigade was detached from its Division and ordered to the assistance of Doubleday’s Division engaged north of this. The Purnell Legion was detached near D. R. Miller’s and did not participate with its Brigade in the action near this point, but was engaged with its Division west of the Dunkard Church. After the repulse of the Brigade near this point, the 78th New York was detached.

From the last of three War Department markers for Goodrich’s Brigade on the Antietam battlefield:

Goodrich’s Brigade was detached from its Division, and supported Gibbon’s and Patrick’s Brigades of the First Army Corps in the fields and woods west of this point.

From the Official Report of Captain Henry Stagg on the 78th New York at Antietam:

We entered the action with 1 field officer (lieutenant-colonel), 1 adjutant, 1 sergeant-major, 2 captains, 3 first lieutenants, 5 second lieutenants, and 208 men. After the death of Colonel Goodrich, Lieutenant-Colonel Austin was left in command of the brigade until the action was over. Our loss in the action was 1 captain killed, 1 adjutant severely wounded, 8 men killed, and 18 wounded.

Official Records: Series 1, Vol 19, Part 1 (Antietam – Serial 27) , Page 516

October Duty at Bolivar Heights
November 9 Reconnaissance to Rippon, West Va.
December 2-6 Reconnaissance from Bolivar Heights to Winchester
December 9-16 March to Fredericksburg, Va.
December Duty at Fairfax
1863
January 20-24 “Mud March”
April 27-May 6 Chancellorsville Campaign
May 1-5
Battle of Chancellorsville

The regiment loast 131 casualties

June 11-July 24 Gettysburg Campaign
July 1-3
Battle of Gettysburg

Commanded by Lieutenant Colonel Herbert Von Hammerstein. The regiment brought 198 men to the field and lost 6 killed, 21 wounded and 3 missing.

July 5-24 Pursuit of Lee to Manassas Gap, Va.
August-September Duty on line of the Rappahannock
September 24-October 3 Movement to Bridgeport, Ala. attached to 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 12th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland
October 26-29 Reopening Tennessee River
October 28-29 Battle of Wauhatchie, Tenn.
November 23-27 Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign
November 23-24 Battle of Lookout Mountain
November 25 Mission Ridge
November 27 Ringgold Gap, Taylor’s Ridge
Decmber-May Duty at Bridgeport, Ala.
1864
April Attached to 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 20th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland
May 1 to July 12 Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign
May 8-11 Operations about Rocky Faced Ridge, Tunnel Hill and Buzzard’s Roost Gap
May 14-15 Battle of Resaca
May 19 Near Cassville
May 25 New Hope Church
May 26-June 5 Battles about Dallas, New Hope Church and Allatoona Hills
June 10-July 2 Operations about Marietta and against Kenesaw Mountain
June 11-14 Pine Hill
June 15-17 Lost Mountain
June 15 Gilgal or Golgotha Church
June 17 Muddy Creek
June 19 Noyes’ Creek
June 22 Kolb’s Farm
June 27 Assault on Kenesaw
July 4 Ruff’s Station, Smyrna Camp Ground
July 5-12 Chattahoochie River
July 12 Consolidated with 102nd Regiment New York Infantry