Confederate Regiments & BatteriesGeorgia


A total of 288 men served in the Troup Battery during the Civil War. Nine died from wounds and forty from disease.

1858
The Troup Battery’s immediate ancestor was created as the National Artillery in Athens, Georgia. A. A. Franklin Hill was elected captain.
1861
January The battery was renamed the Troup Battery after former Georgia Governor George M. Troup. Captain Hill left to become an officer in the First Georgia Regular Regiment. The battery elected Marcellus Stanley as captain and Doctor Henry Hull Carlton as First Lieutenant.
April 24 The battery left Athens for Savannah for two months drill. They were equipped with one 12 pounder howitzer, two 6 pounder smoothbore howitzers, and a James Rifle.
April 26 Mustered into Confederate service.
July 5 Arrived in Richmond before being sent to Western Virginia.
August 1 A small dog adopted the battery at Staunton. Named “Charlie,” he accompanied the battery until his death at the very end of the war, taking huge pleasure in the firing of the cannons, sharing the battery’s ups and downs and providing the occasional chicken and rabbit for the communal pot.
September-November
Cheat Mountain Campaign

Assigned to Gilham’s Brigade, Army of the Northwest.

November Returned from western Virginia and assigned to the Department of the Penninsula. Attached to Cobb’s Legion, a combined arms unit of infantry, cavalry and artillery. The legion concept did not fit well with Civil War operations and the three branches operated separately through most of the war.
1862
January-April Assigned to McLaws’s Division, Department of the Penninsula.
April
Siege of Yorktown

Assigned to Cobb’s Brigade, McLaws’s Division, Department of Northern Virginia. The battery was reorganized under the command of Captain Henry Hull Carlton, a physician.

April 5
Battle of Lee’s Mill
April 16
Dam Number 1
April 29 The battery reorganized for the duration of the war. They elected Doctor Henry Hull Carlton as captain.
May-June Assigned to Cobb’s Brigade, Magruder’s Division, Army of Northern Virginia.
June-July Assigned to Cobb’s Brigade, Magruder’s Division, Magruder’s Command, Army of Northern Virginia.
June 25-July 1
Seven Days Battles
July 1
Battle of Malvern Hill
July-August Assigned to Cobb’s Brigade, McLaws’s Division, Longstreet’s Command, Army of Northern Virginia.
September-July Assigned to Artillery Battalion, McLaws’s Division, Longstreet’s Command, Army of Northern Virginia.
September 14
Battle of South Mountain (Crampton’s Gap)

A two gun section of the battery was in action, losing one gun captured.

September 17
Battle of Sharpsburg (Antietam)

The battery was commanded by Captain H. H. Carlton. It seems that it brought only one officer and 26 men to the field, serving 1 12 pounder howitzer and two to pounder Parrot Rifles. It is believed that the battery left two 6 pounder Smoothbores at Leesburg at the before the start of the campaign due to lack of crews. Private Benjamin Carlton, brother to Captain Carlton, was killed, and eight men were wounded.

December 13
Battle of Fredericksburg
1863
May 1-4
Battle of Chancellorsville (Second Fredericksburg and Salem Church)
July-September Assigned to Cabell’s Battalion, 1st Corps Artillery, Army of Northern Virginia.
July 1-3
Battle of Gettysburg

The battery was commanded by Captain Henry H. Carlton, who was wounded on July 3. First Lieutenant C.W. Motes then took command.

From the marker to the first section of the Troup Artillery on the Gettysburg battlefield:

The Troup Artillery
First Section Two 10 Pounder Parrotts

July 2. This section took position here 3.30 P. M. and was actively engaged until near dark.

July 3. In position on the main artillery line on ridge in front of Spangler’s Woods. Took part in the great cannonade and after repulse of Longstreet’s assault advanced 300 yards and aided in checking pursuit. Retired from the front after dark.

July 4. Remained near here all day inactive short of ammunition. After night withdrew from the field.

From the marker to the second section:

Second Section Two 12 Pounder Howitzers

July 2. This section took position here at 4 P. M. and was actively engaged until dark.

July 3. In position near main artillery line but under cover of hill in front of Spangler’s Woods. After repulse of Longstreet’s assault advanced 300 yards and aided in checking pursuit. Retired from the front after dark.

July 4. In position here all day and withdrew from the field after dark. Their ammunition was nearly exhausted.

Losses of both sections Killed 1 Wounded 6 Horses of both sections killed or disabled 17

July 10
Antietam Creek
September-April Assigned to Cabell’s Battalion, Reserve Artillery, Army of Northern Virginia.
1864
February 6-7
Battle of Raccoon Ford
April Assigned to Cabell’s Battalion, 1st Corps Artillery, Army of Northern Virginia.
April 3 Captain Carlton returned from recovering from his Gettysburg wound.
May 5-6
Battle of the Wilderness
May 8-21
Battle of Spotsylvania Court House
May 23-26
Battle of North Anna
June 1-3
Battle of Cold Harbor

Captain Carlton was wounded

June-April
Siege of Petersburg
1865
April 7 Charlie was killed during the retreat from Petersburg by a stray shell. He was tearfully buried under a large shade tree.
April 8
Appomattox Station

Most of the battery was captured with Walker’s artillery park by Federal xavalry

April 9
Appomattox Court House

A handful of men who had escaped capture at Appomattox Station surrendered with Lee’ army.