Confederate Regiments & Batteries * South Carolina


“Coast Rangers”

1861
November 11 Organized at Camp Green in Charleston under the command of Colonel Lewis M. Hatch by adding three companies to the seven companies of Hatch’s Battalion of Coast Rangers. Assigned to the Department of South Carolina and Georgia.
1862
January-June Assigned to 2nd Military District of South Carolina, Department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida
May Reorganization of the regiment, which formally became the 23rd South Carolina Infantry Regiment. Colonel Hatch resigned and returned to state commands. Henry L. Benbow was elected colonel.
June-July Assigned to 1st Military District of South Carolina, Department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida
July Moved to Virginia and assigned to Evans’s Brigade, Drayton’s Division, Longstreet’s Command, Army of Northern Virginia
August-October Assigned to Evans’s Independent Brigade, Longstreet’s Command, Army of Northern Virginia
August 6 Occupation of Malvern Hill
August 23
Rappahannock Station
August 28-30
Second Battle of Manassas (Bull Run)

The regiment lost 153 casualties out of the 225 men engaged. Colonel Benbow and Lieutenant Colonel Roberts were wounded, Major John Whilden was killed, and Captain Murden of Company A was wounded and captured. Captain Solomon A. Durham of Company H took command as senior surviving officer.

September 14
Battle of South Mountain

The regiment was commanded by Captain Durham of Company H until he was wounded. Lieutenant Edwin R. White of Company D then took command.

September 17
Battle of Sharpsburg (Antietam)

The regiment lost 10 men killed, 22 wounded, and 5 missing in the Maryland Campaign.

October-November Assigned to Evans’s Brigade, McLaws’s Division, 1st Corps, Army of Northern Virginia
November-February Moved to North Carolina and assigned to Evans’s Brigade, French’s Command, Department of North Carolina and Southern Virginia
December 31
Battle of Goldsborough Bridge

Colonel Benbow was wounded and Captain Durham was wounded and disabled for further field service.

1863
February-March In camp near Wilmington, North Carolina. Assigned to Evans’s Brigade, District of Cape Fear, Department of North Carolina and Southern Virginia.
May Assigned to Evans’s Brigade, 1st Military District of South Carolina, Department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida
June Moved to Jackson, Mississippi by way of Meridian. Assigned to Evans’s Brigade, Breckinridge’s Division, Department of the West
June-July Assigned to Evans’s Brigade, French’s Division, Department of the West
July
Siege of Jackson, Mississippi
July-August Assigned to Evans’s Brigade, French’s Division, Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana
August Moved by rail to Mobile, to Savannah, Georgia and assigned to Evans’s Brigade, 2nd Sub-division, 1st Military District of South Carolina, Department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida
August-September
Charleston Harbor

Moved to Charleston and assigned to Evans’s Brigade, Military District of Georgia, Department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida.

October-March Assigned to Evans’s Brigade, 1st Military District of South Carolina, Department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida. The regiment mustered 297 men.
November-February On Sullivan’s Island, Charleston Harbor.
1864
May 17-June 16
Bermuda Hundred
June 9
First Assault on Petersburg

(Company F)

June 18 The regiment was divided. Colonel Benbow commanded the right and lieutenant Colonel Kinloch the left of the regiment. Major Matthew V. Bancroft was mortally wounded.
June
Siege of Petersburg

Assigned to Elliott’s-Wallace’s Brigade, Johnson’s Division, Department of North Carolina and Southern Virginia

July 30
Battle of the Crater

The regiment lost 49 casualties. Colonel Benbow was wounded and Captain Edwin R. White took command as senior officer.

October Assigned to Wallace’s Brigade, Johnson’s Division, 4th Corps. Army of Northern Virginia. Captain Henry H. Lesesne of Company I was promoted to major.
1865
March 25
Battle of Fort Stedman
April 1
Battle of Five Forks

Colonel Benbow was wounded and captured.

April 6
Battle of Saylers Creek
April 9
Appomattonx Court House

The regiment surrendered 5 officers and 103 enlisted men.

Lieutenant Colonels Allen J. Green, John M. Kinloch, Edgar O. Murden, and John Roberts; and Majors  L.P. Miller