Confederate Regiments & BatteriesSouth Carolina


The 4th South Carolina Cavalry Regiment lost over 260 men killed, or died of wounds or disease, the most of any South Carolina Cavalry unit.

1862
December 16 Created by combining the  companies of the 10th South Carolina Cavalry Battalion with the 12th South Carolina Cavalry Battalion. They were under the command of Colonel Benjamin H. Rutledge, Lieutenant Colonel William Stokes, and Major William P. Emanuel. Six companies were assigned to the 3rd Military District of South Carolina, Department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida. Four companies were assiged to the 1st Military District of South Carolina, Department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida.
1863
April 9 Destruction of the George Washington near Beaufort
June 2 Combahee River
June 4 Expedition from Fort Pulaski to Bluffton (Company B)
August-September Assiged to the 5th Sub-division, 1st Military District of South Carolina, Department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida.
September 13-14 Lowndes’s Mill
September Company K assigned to the 1st Military District of South Carolina, Department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida.
November 24 Near Cunningham’s Bluff
December-March Company K assigned to the 5th Military District of South Carolina, Department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida.
1864
May-January Moved to Virginia and assigned to Butler’s-Dunovant’s Brigade, Hampton’s-Butler’s Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of Northern Virginia.
May 5-6
Battle of the Wilderness
May 8-21
Battle of Spotsylvania Court House
May 23-26
Battle of North Anna
May 28
Haw’s Shop

From May 28 to June 12 the regiment woud lose more then 280 casualties.

May 30
Battle of  Matadequin Creek,
June 1-3
Battle of Cold Harbor
June
Siege of Petersburg
June 28
Battle of Trevillian Station
October 1
Vaughan Road
1865
January-April Moved by railroad to South Carolina and assigned to Butler’s Brigade, Butler’s Division, Hampton’s Cavalry Command
February-April
Carolinas Campaign
April Assigned to Logan’s Brigade, Butler’s Division, Hampton’s Cavalry Command, Army of Tennessee
April 26
Durham Station

Less than 200 men remained with the colors when surrendered by General Johnston. According to Lieutenant Colonel Stokes, he ordered the regiment to march to Asheboro and disbanded them there rather than taking part in the surrender.