Confederate Regiments & Batteries > Virginia


1861
May Organized at Manassas Junction under Coloner Philip St. George Cocke, Lieutenant Colonel John Bowie Strange (VMI 1842) and Major Henry Gantt. Colonel Cocke was immediately involved in higher command, and Lt. Colonel Strange commande the regiment.
June 20 Colonel Cocke assigned to command of the Fifth Brigade, Army of the Potomac, consisting of the 8th, 18th, 19th and 28th and 49th Virginia Infantry Regiments. Lieutenant Colonel John B. Strange officially took command of the regiment.
July 13 William Watts was elected major.
July 21
First Battle of Manassas, or Bull Run

Commanded by Lieutenant Colonel John B. Strange, while Colonel Cocke commanded the brigade. The regiment lost 6 enlisted men casualties

August 20 Major Watts transferred to the 28th Virginia
October 21 Colonel Cocke was promoted to brigadier general
1862
March Brigadier General George E. Pickett took command of the brigade.
April The regiment was reported with 650 effectives
April 29 Lieutenant Colonel Strange was promoted to colonel.
May Attached to Pickett’s Brigade, Longstreet’s Division, Army of Northern Virginia
May 5
Battle of Williamsburg
June 27
Battle of Gaines’ Mill

Brigadier General Pickett was wounded, and Colonel Hutton took command of the brigade.

August Attached to Pickett’s Brigade, Kemper’s Division
August 28-30
Second Battle of Manassas (Bull Run)
September Brigadier General Richard Brooke Garnett takes temporary command of the brigade, which is transferred to Major General David R. Jones’ Division
Seven Days

The regiment lost 138 casualties during the week of fighting.

Maryland Campaign
September 14
Battle of South Mountain

Colonel John Strange was mortally wounded and Lieutenant M.J. Shepherd of Company B was killed. The regiment lost 63 of the 150 men it brought into action. Captain John L. Cocharan took command of the regiment with the fall of Colonel Strange.

September 17
Battle of Sharpsburg, or Antietam

The regiment was reduced to 50 men commanded by the acting Adjutant, Lieutenant William N. Wood. It fought just to the east of the village at the top of the hill, losing 8 men.

From the War Department marker to Garnett’s Brigade on the Antietam battlefield:

Garnett’s Brigade reached Sharpsburg at 11 A.M. September 15th, and took position on the southwest slope of Cemetery Hill where it remained until the morning of the 17th, when it relieved Geo. T. Anderson’s Brigade in support of the Washington Artillery. When that command was relieved by S. D. Lee’s Artillery in the afternoon, the Brigade advanced into the cornfield in front of Lee’s guns, between this point and the cemetery wall, and engaged the right of the advancing Federal line.

The right of the Confederate line west of the Burnside Bridge Road being turned, the Brigade was withdrawn, by the cross streets, to the north of the town, and cooperated with Drayton’s Brigade and A.P. Hill’s Division in the attack on the Federal left.

November 28 Brigadier General Garnett was given permanent command of the brigade and George E. Pickett was given command of the division, assigned to to Longstreet’s newly-created 1st Corps..
December 13
Battle of Fredericksburg
1863
February Took part in Longstreet’s Suffolk Expedition, missing the Battle of Chancellorsville.
May Rejoined Lee’s main army on the Rappahannock.
July 2-3
Battle of Gettysburg

The regiment was commanded by Colonel Henry Gantt and brought 328 men to the field. It was part of Pickett’s Charge on July 3, sustaining heavy casualties. The regiment lost 42 men killed, 41 wounded, and 68 missing or captured. Colonel Gantt was wounded and Lieutenant Colonel John T. Ellis was mortally wounded, leaving Major William H. Pryor in command of the regiment.

Officer casualties were very heavy. Lieutenants James Grinstead, James Landrum and Richard B. Wood were killed and Lieutenant William B. Le Teller was mortally wounded and captured.

Captains John C. Culin and Richard J. Harlan and Lieutenants William P. Hamner, James D. McIntire, Horace Smith, and William N. Wood and Assistant Surgeon William H. Taylor were wounded.

Captains Benjamin Brown, Waller M. Boyd, William W. Goss, and Bennett Tayor and Lieutenants James Y. Bragg, Hopkins Hardin, and Sylvester Martin were wounded and captured.

Lieutenant John Hill was captured.

From the marker on the Gettysburg battlefield:

July2. Arrived about sunset and bivouacked on the western border of Spangler’s Woods.

July 3. In the forenoon formed line on Kemper’s left in the field east of the woods. At the cessation of the cannonade advanced and took part in Longstreet’s assault on the Union position in the vicinity of the Angle. This advance was made in good order under a storm of shells and grape and a deadly fire of musketry after passing the Emmitsburg Road. The lines were much broken in crossing the post and rail fences on both sides of that road but with shattered ranks the Brigade pushed on and took part in the final struggle at the Angle. Gen. R. B. Garnett fell dead from his saddle in front of the stone wall.

July 4. Spent the day in reorganization and during the night began the march to Hagerstown.

September 9 Detached from the 1st Corps and transferred to the Richmond area.
1864
March 3 Captain Boyd was paroled
May 16 Drewry’s Bluff
May 21-23 Returned north of the James river and rejoined the Army of Northern Virginia attached to the 1st Corps under Major General Richard Anderson.
May 23-26
Battle of the North Anna
June 3
Battle of Cold Harbor
June 18 Siege of Petersburg begins
October 24 Captain Waller M. Boyd of Company G was promoted to major.
1865
March 31
White Oak Road
 April 1
Battle of Five Forks 

The regiment suffered heavy casualties.

 April 6
Sayler’s Creek

The survivors of the regiment were captured, including Major Boyd.

April 9
Appomattox Court House

the regiment surrendered 1 officer and 29 men who had eluded capture at Sayler’s Creek