The 95th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment lost 5 officers and 114 enlisted men killed or mortally wounded and 1 officer and 136 enlisted men to disease during the Civil War. It is honored by a monument at Gettysburg.

1861
November
to March
Organized at New York City under Colonel George H. Biddle, Lieutenant Colonel James B. Post and Major Edward Pye
1862
March 18 Left State for Washington, D.C.
March-May Duty in the Defenses of Washington, D, C. attached to Wadsworth’s Command, Military District of Washington, D.C.
May At Aquia Creek, Va. attached to Doubleday’s Brigade, Dept. of the Rappahannock
June Duty at and near Fredericksburg attached to 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 3rd Corps, Pope’s Army of Virginia
August 16-
September 2
Pope’s Campaign in Northern Virginia

The regiment lost 13 men killed or mortally wounded, 20 men wounded and 80 men missing in the campaign

August 21-23 Fords of the Rappahannock
August 26 Sulphur Springs
August 28 Battles of Gainesville
August 29 Groveton
August 30
Second Battle of Bull Run
September 6-22 Maryland Campaign. Attached to 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 1st Army Corps, Army of the Potomac
September 14
Battle of South Mountain

The regiment was commanded by Major Edward Pye. It lost 1 man mortally wounded and 3 officers and 8 men wounded

September 16-17
Battle of Antietam

The regiment was commanded by Major Pye, who was promoted to lieutenant colonel around this time. It only lost 1 man wounded as the brigade was in reserve north of the Poffenberger farm to protect the corps artillery.

From the brigade marker on the Antietam battlefield:

Hofmann’s Brigade was held in support of the Corps Artillery.
About noon it was moved to the left in support of the Artillery of the First and Second Corps.
In the afternoon it was returned to the right where it remained until the close of the battle.

September-October Duty at Sharpsburg, Md.
October 30-November 19 Movement to Falmouth, Va.
November 2-3 Union
December 12-15
Battle of Fredericksburg

Colonel Biddle returned to command. The regiment lost 1 killed and 3 wounded

1863
January-April At Falmouth and Belle Plains
January 20-24 “Mud March”
April 27-May 6 Chancellorsville Campaign
April 29-May 2 Operations at Fitzhugh’s Crossing
May 1-5
Battle of Chancellorsville

The regiment lost 2 men wounded in picket firing

June 11-July 24 Gettysburg Campaign
July 1-3
Battle of Gettysburg

The regiment was commanded by Colonel George H. Biddle until he was wounded on July 1st., when Lt. Colonel Edward Pye took command. It brought 261 men to the field.

From the monument:

This Regiment was formed south of the McPherson House and engaged the enemy at 10 a.m. at 10:30 a.m. changed front. Advanced to this position with the 84th New York
and 6th Wisconsin. Repulsed and captured a large part of Davis’ Mississippi Brigade in the railroad cut.

At noon, July 1st, held position on Oak Hill indicated by marker; being outflanked moved to right of Seminary supporting Battery B, 4th U.S. Retired from that position to Culp’s Hill, where it remained during July 2nd and 3rd. Casualties Killed 7. Wounded 62. Missing 46.

July 5-24 Pursuit of Lee to Manassas Gap, Va.
August-October Duty on line of the Rappahannock and Rapidan
October 9-22 Bristoe Campaign
November 7-8 Advance to line of the Rappahannock
November 26-
December 2
Mine Run Campaign
1864
February 6-7 Demonstration on the Rapidan
March Attached to 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, 5th Army Corps
May 3-June 15 Campaign from the Rapidan to the James
May 5-7
Battle of the Wilderness

The regiment lost 3 officers (Captain Burn and Lieutenants Osburn and Woodrow) and 26 men killed or mortally wounded, 59 men wounded and 6 officers and 80 men captured or missing.

May 8 Laurel Hill
May 8-21.
Battle of Spottsylvania Court House

The regiment lost 11 men killed or mortally wounded, 2 officers and 45 men wounded and 7 men missing or captured from Lauren Hill to Spottsylvania

May 12 Assault on the Salient
May 23-26
North Anna River

The regiment lost 1 killed 6 wounded and 1 missing

May 23 Jericho Ford
May 26-28 On line of the Pamunkey
May 28-31 Totopotomoy

The regiment lost 1 killed and 12 wounded

June 1-12
Cold Harbor

Colonel Edward Pye was mortally wounded on June 2nd, dying on the 12th. Major Robert W. Bard took command of the regiment.

June 1-3 Bethesda Church
June 16-18
First Assault on Petersburg; Siege of Petersburg begins

The regiment lost 8 men killed or mortally wounded, 1 oficer and 19 men wounded and 50 men missing or captured

July 30 Mine Explosion, Petersburg (Reserve)
August Attached to 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 5th Army Corps
August 18-21
Weldon Railroad

The regiment lost 6 killed or mortally wounded, 20 wounded and 52 captured. Company E and part of Company C were captured on picket duty, and Major Bard was badly wounded. Private R. Smith, on detached duty as a mounted orderly at brigade headquarters, earned the Medal of Honor for capturing 2 Confederate officers and 20 men.

Late August Coloenl Creney returned to the regiment after recovering from his wound.
September Attached to 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, 5th Army Corps
September 29-October 2
Poplar Springs Church

The regiment lost 3 men killed or mortally wounded, 1 man wounded and 7 men missing or captured

October 27-28
Boydton Plank Road, Hatcher’s Run

The regiment lost 1 man woundend 2 men missing or captured out of 213 men.

December 7-12 Warren’s Raid on Weldon Railroad
1865
February 5-7
Dabney’s Mills, Hatcher’s Run

The regiment lost 6 men killed and mortally wounded, Colonel Creney and 28 men wounded and 2 men missing or captured.

March 25 Regiment mustered out but the majority of the men reenlisted and the regiment was retained in service as a veteran organization consolidated into five companies, A, D, E, H and I.
March 28-April 9
Appomattox Campaign

The regiment lost 10 men killed and mortally wounded, 2 officers and 56 men wounded and 8 men missing or captured

March 29 Lewis Farm, near Gravelly Run
March 31 White Oak Road
April 1
Five Forks

Commanded by Captain George D. Knight, the regiment lost 4 killed, 63 wounded and 9 missing out of 6 officers and 88 men engaged.

April 2 Fall of Petersburg
April 3-9 Pursuit of Lee
April 9 Appomattox Court House, surrender of Lee and his army.
May 1-12 Moved to Washington, D.C.
May 23 Grand Review
June Duty at Washington
July 16 Mustered out